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Robinson Cyprian Unigwe
Moshood Ademola Raji
Moshood Abiola Popoola
Adeola Fatima Balogun
Olayinka Femi Adekunle
Gilbert N Nwokwu
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Robinson Cyprian Unigwe
Moshood Ademola Raji
Moshood Abiola Popoola
Adeola Fatima Balogun
Olayinka Femi Adekunle
Gilbert N Nwokwu
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Journal of Plant and Animal Sciences

Effect of Different Processing Methods on the Proximate Composition of Cassava Peels

Unigwe, Cyprian Robinson, Raji, Ademola Moshood, Popoola, Abiola Moshood, Balogun, Fatima Adeola, Adekunle, Femi Olayinka and Nwokwu, Gilbert N

Federal College of Animal Health and Production Technology, Moor Plantation, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.

Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria.

Accepted 25 July 2017

Citation: Unigwe CR, Raji AM, Popoola AM, Balogun FA,  Adekunle FO and Nwokwu GN (2017). Effect of Different Processing Methods on the Proximate Composition of Cassava Peels. Journal of Plant and Animal Sciences, 2(1): 019-025.

Copyright: © 2017. Unigwe et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are cited.

Abstract

Fresh sweet cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) peels were collected at Orile-Ilugun; an industrial layout in Oyo State, Nigeria, where cassava is being processed to dry granules (garri). The peels were subdivided into four portions and subjected to submerged fermentation, ensiling, boiling and sun-drying treatments. These were further sundried for 3-5 days till they were crispy. Each of them was subjected to proximate analysis and chemical quantification for hydrogen cyanide. The result showed, with respect to crude protein, that ensiled (10.69%) and fermented (9.25%) cassava peels were statistically similar (p<0.05) and superior to boiled (4.92%) and sundried (4.86%). Similarly, the fermented (16.88mg/kg) and ensiled (21.62mg/kg) cassava peels reduced HCN content to permissible levels when compared to boiled (55.21mg/kg) and sun-dried (46.44mg/kg). It is therefore recommended that fermentation and/or ensiling enhance the nutritional value and usability of cassava peel as ingredient in pig’s diet.

Keywords: Cassava peels, processing, fermentation, ensiling, boiling, sun-drying